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Peter Lawrie BSc, BA, MPhil, MBCS, CITP, FSAScot

Peter in MacGregor kilt and 17th century slashed doublet

Peter grew up in Inverness, the Highland capital.  He studied Science and Scottish History at the University of St Andrews.  World famous as the home of golf, St Andrews is also home to Scotland's oldest University, founded in 1411.

Peter began his collection of books on Scottish history whilst still at school and has a continually growing library of around 3000 volumes. Peter took a part-time degree in Humanities with History at the Open University during the 1990s. This course included 'Modern Scottish History since 1707' and 'Family and Community History', which allowed the use of the substantial documentary sources collected over the years on some of his family origins in the Highlands.

He then joined the Masters degree course run by the History department of the University of Dundee and graduated in 2003 with an MPhil for a dissertation on the Clan Gregor between 1583 and 1611. In 2004 he gained a certificate in Scottish Field Archaeology at the University of Glasgow and is a member of the Association of Certified Field Archaeologists.

For many years he has been a member of the Scottish Genealogy Society, the Scottish History Society and is a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland.  

Clan Gregor Society badge Peter's interest in genealogy led to him joining the Clan Gregor Society, where has been for many years Vice-Chairman of Council and editor of the Society's Newsletter. He has written a number of papers for the Society including  'the early history of the Clan Gregor' and  'The Clan Gregor in the 1745 rising'. The MacGregor connection comes through his father's mother. After many years of genealogical research he is confident of his descent from Gregor ghlun dubh MacGregor of Glengyle, nephew of Rob Roy MacGregor. He is equally as proud of his descent from many other Highland clans. Peter has been involved in the MacGregor DNA project through FamilyTreeDNA of Arizona. As the Y-chromosome carries the family tree interest of DNA, Peter's nearest male MacGregor relative took the test, confirming his shared DNA with the Clan chief, Sir Malcolm MacGregor of MacGregor. A fascinating journey of discovery is in its early stages with the DNA project, illustrating both the genetic diversity within the clan, and the relationship of the leading families of Clan Gregor to other clans of Dalriadic origin.
 
Out of an enduring fascination with the impact of the Jacobite risings on the Highland people, Peter has written a novel concerning the exploits of Robert, the son of Gregor MacGregor of Glengyle, during the 1745 Rising. The ebook "MacGregor" is available from Smashwords 324242. Future historical novels are being considered which deal with the lives of Gregor Roy MacGregor, executed in 1571 and Alasdair Roy MacGregor, his son and successor as Clan Chief, who was executed in 1604 after the Battle of Glen Fruin.


The great plaid (feile mor) which Peter wears is a reconstruction by tartan expert Peter MacDonald from museum fragments of the plaid worn by Prince Charles Edward Stewart at the Battle of Culloden in 1746.   Peter Lawrie (left) with Lamar Britt at Callander. Photo Tom Kerr.

On the left, Peter and Lamar Britt, also wearing a feile mor, listen to the Clan Gregor Society Pipe Band.

In the background is Ben Ledi - a distinctive summit on the edge of the fault line which divides the Scottish Highlands from the Lowlands. 

Broughty Ferry. Photo: Dundee & Angus Tourist Board Peter lives with his wife, Mairi, beside the gentle waters of the beautiful Firth of Tay at Broughty Ferry, where dolphins, seals and swans may be spotted.  Nestling on Scotland's east coast half way between Edinburgh and Aberdeen, Broughty Ferry is a charming, bustling village with magnificent views across the estuary to the North Sea and Fife coastline. It has quality shops, cafes, restaurants and bars, which provide an atmospheric warmth for locals and visitors alike. 
The 15th century Broughty Castle by the harbour contains a fascinating small museum. Broughty Castle. Photo: Dundee & Angus Tourist Board For golfers, Broughty Ferry is just 20 minutes from St Andrews, 10 minutes from Carnoustie and 50 minutes from Gleneagles. For those with handicaps, there are many other golf courses within easy reach which are open to visitors. 
Glamis Castle. Photo: Dundee & Angus Tourist board For skiers, Broughty is just over 2 hours drive to the Cairngorms and an hour to Glenshee. The tranquillity of the Angus glens, the historic grandeur of Glamis Castle, Arbroath with its famous Abbey, or the busy cities of Perth,  Stirling, Aberdeen, Glasgow and Edinburgh are all within easy driving distance. Nearby Dundee, Scotland's 4th city, offers excellent recreational facilities including the Repertory Theatre, museums, cinemas, arts centres, restaurants, bowling and ice-rink. For maritime interest, Captain Scott's Dundee-built ship RRS Discovery and the oldest British warship still afloat, the Frigate Unicorn are both open to visitors. Find out more about Angus & Dundee
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